Wisdom of Life

Making Love A-Crime

Making-Love–A-Crime—Criminalization-in-Sub-Saharan-Africa—Amnesty-International

The report has benefited from extensive desk-based research into national laws, academic  materials, court judgements, international and regional human rights law, as well as Amnesty  International’s ongoing engagement with international and Making-Love--A-Crime---Criminalization-in-Sub-Saharan-Africa---Amnesty-Internationalregional human rights advocacy.

This report is also based on over 60 interviews with activists, survivors of violence,  academics, human rights defenders, legal and medical professionals in Uganda,  Cameroon, Kenya and South Africa, which took place in 2011. The intent of these interviews  is not to generate region-wide trends, but toprovide specific examples of how the legal  framework in these selected countries affects the enjoyment of human rights for LGBTI  people. Amnesty International would like to thank Professor Matthew Weait for his extensive  contributions to this report, as well as the numerous people who agreed to be interviewed for  this report.

Activists, academics and others generously gave their timeto share their advice  and experiences, which have informed the content of, and greatly enriched, this report.

 

Making-Love--A-Crime---Criminalization-in-Sub-Saharan-Africa---Amnesty-International

Making-Love–A-Crime—Criminalization-in-Sub-Saharan-Africa—Amnesty-International

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